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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
it work. maybe they should bring over the n.s.a. for that. but almost certainly the computer bugs that have made it almost impossible for a lot of people to sign up, that is going to get fixed. maybe not on the time line that people would like to see. and then we find out whether it really works. because what's going to happen, what has to happen, for this health care system to work as president obama has promised us that it will, is that a lot of healthy people are going to have to sign up for these exchanges along with sick people. we know that people with pre-existing conditions, with illnesses, we know that they are very motivated and they are going to sit there and do whatever it takes to get into these exchanges. now the question is, is it going to function well enough that young healthy people will as well? gwen: we know that right now, young healthy people or anybody can't really get on the site. and that the administration is guilty of at least overstating whether people would be able to keep the coverage they want right now. >> one of the things that has emerged and we'v
. >> the american people are mad as hell. the nsa scandal, is there anyone out there we are not spying on? >> we do not spy on anyone except for valid for chris's. -- purposes. we only work within the law. >> cutbacks of food stamps. >> after these cuts, the average benefit per person will be $1.40 per meal. >> if you are looking for good news, try boston. >> this is for you, boston. [applause] >> you guys deserve it. >> the greatest place on earth. >> president obama said it over and over. if you like your insurance plan you could keep it. the health care act will not change that. it turns out that millions of americans who are buying limited coverage are receiving letters after all. the president's response. >> if you're getting one of these letters, shop around in the new marketplace. you will get a better deal. >> the law requires that health insurance now covers hospital, maternity, mental health, and prescription drugs. >> if insurers decide it is a downgrade we said under the law you have to replace them with quality, comprehensive coverage. >> why not tell that to the american people to beg
a separate house panel faced a barrage of questions about n.s.a. surveillance of u.s. allies. >> ifill: and one year after superstorm sandy, what american cities can learn from the netherlands, as they prepare for the next big storm. >> test test test for newshour. testing testing. >> you are quite surprised to see a city like new york, so many people expose and no levees and no protection at all, that was astonishing to me. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> united healthcare-- online at uhc.com. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: members of congress took fresh aim at the new
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: the uproar over n.s.a. spying spread today after new reports detailed the extent of the agency's surveillance activity in germany and spain. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. judy woodruff is off. also ahead this monday, in detroit, the court battle over the city's bankruptcy brings michigan's governor to the stand. and lessons learned from hurricane sandy. miles o'brien reports on how new york city is preparing for the next superstorm. test one year later the people who keep this city running are scrambling to figure out how to keep dry as the storms and the sea level rises. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> united healthcare-- online at uhc.com. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was m
by the government on the company's spying would be wrong. he said his company has registered complaints with the nsa, president obama and congress. >>> and one of of the country's big home builders is where we begin the focus, tri-point homes is buying it for $2.7 billion, the transaction will give tri-point access to land in key markets and make the company one of the ten biggest markets in the united states. the shares rose to 15.16, wearhouse up a fraction, to 3730. and shares of cisco rose, the giant faced higher food profits and business, which was down from last year, the stock went up more than 4% to 33.96. >>> and active investment certainly working for icahn, they say now is the time to be an activist investor because of local rates and management at u.s. companies. shares at icahn rose to 108.95. and a comeback helped vulcan. their net income more than doubled in the third quarter, revenues trumped consensus. the stock became the best performing stock in the s&p 500 today. >>> and lululemon's problems surfaced again today. they are hit with complaints that some of their pants are see-throu
the predicament. countries do gather intel janssen on one another, but the scale and the scope of the n.s.a. revelations have been massive, and there needs to be a response from washington, and so far there hasn't been. last weeden the ference president and chancellor angela merkel had angry conversations with the president. i think finally we are going to a point where something is happening. >> and the europeans are now threatening practical repercussions about american access to terrorist funds. is that the first sign that the europeans are not just going to say we are angry, we are going to do something about this? >> it is. it is about waking washington up. a review of our intelligence gathering is not going to be enough. we have to change the approach and the relationship. the swift agreement is in peril. other things could be in peril. safe harbor agreements, passenger name recognition. all of the important data that , not re transatlanticly to mention the trade and investment partnership. >> while they want to send washington a message that they are not happy, they don't want to jeo
intelligence, and involves millions of records every day. the n.s.a. director-- army general keith alexander-- challenged the report, which surfaced from more material leaked by edward snowden. alexander said to his knowledge, the agency has not tapped the company's servers. two top german officials were in washington today, pursuing reports that the n.s.a. monitored chancellor angela merkel's cellphone. and in madrid, spanish prime minister mariano rajoy went before his parliament to address allegations that spain, too, was a target of u.s. surveillance. >> ( translated ): the key is to clarify what happened and generate confidence because without that, it is very difficult to work for the rights, liberties and security of our citizens. i hope we will get this. we have already requested the appearance of the head of spain's intelligence services and he will appear in this chamber as soon as possible. >> ifill: the government of china also weighed in, announcing today it will strengthen information security, to guard against outside surveillance. chinese police say they've arrested five peop
's command there. it is strange, iraq must be the only country in the world that today would like more nsa surveillance on its territory, but they literally want to know where these people are and how to target them. i think the u.s. is -- they know maliki, maliki has been a disappointment to u.s. special, as ajami suggests we went way too forward with him, he was a petty tyrant, some years ago but now as the worm turns, here is maliki in washington looking for help and in this case, there are reasons why the u.s. ought to give him some help because it is in our interest. >> rose: a group of snawrs wrote to the president accused him of failure of governance that contributed to the surge in violence. what role did that have? what impact will that have? >> you are asking me, charlie, republicans in the senate led by senator mccain and senator gram are just on a warpath in general about the obama administration foreign policy in the middle east arguing it is failing .. in many dimensions. i think there are so many elements that they oppose, the one i would focus on for your viewers is, i thi
this is really a business problem for them if we look at them an adjunct to the n.s.a. i'm supporting the megadata analysis we do of potential terrorist bus to do it to your friends is a complete destruction of trust we had an op-ed calling on two things, the president should apologize, that's clearly right. blanket apology to angela merkel and we should have a treaty we won't do it to other leaders who are close friends and allies. >> the administration is sounding like they're going to pull back but they're saying they need to do a big sweep just in case there's something out there. >> that's what secretary kerry-- who was the most credible figure who was not in any way tainted-- to make this statement. i mean he acknowledged -- david makes a good point. he acknowledged what everybody knows and that is that it's gone too far. and the fact is, judy, it's one thing to spy on germany. they've been spying apparently on mrs. merkel since 2002 or france or italy or spain or asian league companies but you don't mess with apple or google and they're upset they've put the defense in a -- the
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)